Climate Grief Workshop in May

We are finally making it happen! The time has come sweet ones to honor our pain for this world together as a community. 

Our experience of moral pain for our world springs from our interconnectedness with all beings – including humans of all cultures – from which also arise our powers to act on their behalf. When we deny or repress our pain for the world, or view it as a private pathology, our power to take part in the healing of our world is diminished. Our capacity to respond to our own and others’ suffering – that is, the feedback loops that weave us into life – can be unblocked.

We are hosting a 2 day workshop with Oakland facilitator Lydia Violet Harutoonian, assisted by the one and only BJ Star (Barbara Jefferson) from Joanna Macy’s The Work That Reconnects. (See more details below). 

I will most definitely be there. We will be bringing my FAVORITE MUSIC to close us out in concert Sunday evening ~ seriously, my favorite group – Earth Practice. Additionally, Lydia’s band (and also my own-Amora) will be offering songs to get the evening started.

Because this is a journey we will take together as a community, we ask that you attend both days as we will be building a container of trust as we go. However, if you cannot make it to the workshop for both days, please join us for Sunday’s concert (an alcohol free event). 

We have limited space and will close ticket sales at capacity. Please get your tickets here. 

We will provide a lunch and light refreshments throughout both days. 

TWO DAY WORKSHOP:

Saturday May 16, 2020: 10am-6pm (hot meal 1pm)
Sunday May 17, 2020: 12:30pm-6:30pm (hot meal 3:30pm)
Concert Sunday evening with a Tea Bar (non-alcoholic event) 7pm-10pm

Location: Southside Commons

Prices for two day workshop, concert and food included:
General Admission: $100-$300 
Marginalized Communities/Low Income Admission: $25-$300 ($25 minimum to hold your spot: can be refunded if desired at the event.)
Concert Only: (alcohol free event)
General Admission: $10-$50 

In the spirit of micro-reparations for slavery, racism, and the displacement of indigenous people, we offer admission to this event by donation for black, indigenous and other people of color. General admission to this event is priced to make it accessible and affordable, please pay at the highest level that you can afford to do your part in making this event accessible to marginalized communities and low-income folks. (We realize that this policy is merely a gesture towards the need for much broader reparations and justice, and are open to feedback about how this policy can change and evolve over time. We are listening, and are committed to learning.)

Regardless, no one will be turned away for lack of funds. Please contact Ahlay for any questions or concerns.

Proceeds beyond event costs will be donated to Real Rent Duwamish and 350 Seattle.  
Do you have accessibility needs? Will you need childcare in order to attend? Please let Ahlay know ASAP.

I am profoundly grateful to be sharing this work with you and to be deepening our purpose together as a community. Hope to see you there. 

In growth, 
Ahlay Blakely | Community Resilience 

Supported by U Productions 
Settlers on the homelands and waters of the Duwamish, Suquamish
Muckleshoot, Tulalip, and other Coast Salish peoples

MORE DETAILS ABOUT THE CONTENT OF THE WORKSHOP

From The Work That Reconnects Website:

Foundations of the Work: To those of us growing up in the Industrial Growth Society, a breathtakingly new view of reality arises from deep ecology, systems thinking, and the resurgence of nondualistic spirituality. These three streams attest to our mutual belonging in the web of life, and to powers within us for the healing of our world. They are basic to the core assumptions of the Work That Reconnects.

Core Assumptions of the Work That Reconnects:

  1. Our Earth is alive. It is not a supply house and sewer for the Industrial Growth Society. As most indigenous traditions teach, the Earth is our larger body.
  2. Our true nature is far more ancient and encompassing than the separate self defined by habit and Western society. We are as intrinsic to our living world as the rivers and trees, woven of the same flows of matter/energy and mind. The planet as a living system, having evolved us into self-reflexive consciousness, can now know and see itself through us, behold its own majesty, tell its own stories — and also respond to its own suffering.

Our experience of moral pain for our world springs from our interconnectedness with all beings – including humans of all cultures – from which also arise our powers to act on their behalf. When we deny or repress our pain for the world, or view it as a private pathology, our power to take part in the healing of our world is diminished. Our capacity to respond to our own and others’ suffering – that is, the feedback loops that weave us into life – can be unblocked.


Grace Hopeshe/her
PNW Regional Organizer350.org | 425-890-2145Monday, Wednesday – Friday, 9-5pm PST