Tag Archives: I-1631

One more chance for WA’s “Green Wave”

…with inaction at the federal level, maybe a single state paving the way is our best hope for catalyzing broader action. Someone needs to lead. With lessons learned from this most recent failure, and more Democratic seats picked up in the state legislature — offering a firmer legislative route to passing a carbon tax — Inslee may yet be proved right in casting that leader as the state of Washington.

Column by Catherine Rampell, who covers the intersection between politics and economics for the Washington Post:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-evergreen-state-just-rejected-the-green-wave-will-it-ever-wash-ashore/2018/11/12/9f0dd9fc-e6bf-11e8-bbdb-72fdbf9d4fed_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.7862f741204c

1631 opponents: Make good on your word

“Opponents argued a better proposal was needed. They must now stand by their word in calling for a better proposal.”

Note from the chart below that Jefferson and Clallam Counties generated some of the highest percentages of Yes votes on 1631! Kudos to all who helped spread the word about the need for substantive, immediate climate action.

From CarbonWA: Initiative 1631 Falls Short

We applaud the immense effort made by 1631 campaign volunteers and staff. However, the initiative has fallen short of passing. Here is our statement on the result:

There is mounting evidence that a growing majority of Americans are concerned about climate change and support climate action. While Initiative 1631 failed to attract majority support, that does not change the fact that Yale University’s extensive research shows 70 percent of Washington voters believe global warming is happening and would support regulations on carbon emissions. Voters are demanding a solution, even if they didn’t accept this one. I-1631 deserves praise for attracting a broad coalition of support, including from Carbon Washington. Yet the policy failed to attract bipartisan support and contained elements that caused concern, as we highlighted in our analysis of the proposal. Opponents argued a better proposal was needed. They must now stand by their word in calling for a better proposal.

Carbon Washington will continue to advocate for solutions that bridge our deep partisan divides, not enlarge them, and that are effective, equitable and economically sound. But, we cannot do this work alone. We urge everyone, Republicans and Democrats, energy companies and community activists, opponents and proponents of 1631, to join us in the spirit of compromise to find solutions that fulfill our duty to protect our common home. Read our full statement here

We’ll continue to analyze the results and look for insights. However, one supporter created this chart comparing I-732 to the first round of results from I-1631.

1631 vote % by county

The Future of Climate Action

The climate movement needs solutions that can bring people together across regional, political, and economic divides. Strategies that hinge on ‘overwhelming’ the other side cannot be counted on to succeed. At CarbonWA, we will continue to advocate for a price on carbon because it is the most efficient tool we have to reduce carbon emissions. A campaign outcome doesn’t change that reality. We will invite the traditional opponents of climate action to join the discussion to shape the path forward. We will pursue other climate policies in the upcoming legislative session as well. Our work on land-use climate solutions, like carbon sequestration and biochar, will continue. We support efforts for a low carbon fuel standard regionally and in the legislature. Some of our partners are pushing for 100% clean energy, and we will look for cost-effective ways we can decarbonize our electricity system toward that goal. Stay tuned and expect to hear about opportunities to support our ambitious legislative campaigns.

If you want to be a part of this work, please let us know. We need talented, engaged volunteers to join our legislative committee, communications team, and fundraising committee.

Like what you’re reading? Help us continue to represent your views and give you the straight scoop on what’s happening. Your donation will multiply our effectiveness.

-The CarbonWA Team

I-1631 could save billions in health costs

Washingtonians could save billions in health costs just by cleaning the air

Kristin EberhardLaura Skelton and Sarah Cornett of the Sightline Institute

First American PAC promotes I-1631

First ad features Quinault Tribe executive director

The first commercial produced by the First American Project PAC, a coalition of Washington’s Tribes and allies, stands in support of I-1631. This unedited, long-form commercial features President Fawn Sharp of the Quinault Tribe. Multiple other leaders will be featured in the next two weeks in ads.

Preview YouTube video Yes on I-1631 – The First American Project – 2 min.

 

How you can help 1631 NOW

From 350.org:
  1. Sign up for a shift to knock doors or make phone calls near you with other Yes on 1631 volunteers — find the next event here. (If you can sign up for a volunteer shift, this is where the campaign needs you most!)
  2. Sign up here to call voters from the comfort of your home.
  3. Join us in texting voters. Sign up for a texting shift here.
  4. Spread the word by emailing your friends using Voter Circle, a simple tool that lets you send personalized messages to friends who are registered to vote in Washington.

Poll: 1631 has Big Oil on the ropes!

This Elway poll has some good news for making carbon polluters accountable:

https://crosscut.com/2018/10/poll-nations-first-carbon-fee-leading-among-voters

This poll shows that:
 
1) I-1631 is leading among voters, and it’s clear that Washingtonians don’t trust big oil despite their $21 million in fancy advertising.
 
2) This election is going to be close, but we CAN win and defeat big oil and their money.
 
3) Undecided voters will come down to who they trust, and every conversation we have with our neighbors, our friends, and at the doors we knock on is essential to help us win.
 
This is a moment for us all to step up.  We have a lot of work to do in the next 25 days to connect with voters and remind them of the vision we all share for this state. With your help and all of our hard work, we can do this!

We can’t do this without YOU. Here are some of the ways you can help: 

Volunteer door knock – It is powerful democracy in action!  Big Oil is already spending more than $20 million to defeat us, but we have the Power of the People.  Please sign up for a shift here.

Calling voters who might need a nudge to vote – this is a huge priority for the campaign, and we need lots of help. We need to ensure these registered voters turn in their ballots. Here is the link for you to schedule yourself for a phonebanking shift (Human-to-human calls are a very powerful tool!) Here is the link to our dialer toolkit.  If you want to call from downtown Seattle this link has all of Washington Environmental Council’s phone banks for 1631, Sunday-Thursday.

Texting – We are doing texts to help Get Out The Vote. You can sign up for a texting shift here.

Small Business Endorsements -Do you know a small business owner you can ask? Maybe your favorite coffee shop? If you get a yes, be sure to fill out this form and we can get them a sign for their window.

If you want to help in a more substantial way by volunteering full or part time for the campaign, let me know! Or if you can host an organizer from out of town, please sign up here.

Go here to learn more about the YES on 1631 campaign, and its endorsers.

We Can. We Must. We Will!

Clallam PUD’s opposition to I-1631: What part of “Utility” don’t you understand?

Clallam PUD Sides with Petroleum Industry in Opposition to Carbon Initiative

by Andy Cochrane, President, Power Trip Energy | Oct 3, 2018

The Clallam PUD board of commissioners has taken the step of publicly opposing Initiative 1631, citing increased operating costs and higher gasoline prices as reasons for opposition.  Clallam County PUD officials say the carbon fee initiative would increase the district’s annual fuel and shipping costs by $20,000 in 2020 and by $51,000 by 2035.  Clallam PUD’s revenue is about $75 million per year, so the initial $20,000 projected increase in 2020 amounts to approximately 0.027% of the PUD’s revenue.

PUD Commissioner Simpson also reportedly was concerned about negative impacts to the PUD from a wider adoption of electric vehicles.  “There’s impact on any utility of upgrading their system to accommodate the charging of batteries for electric cars,” Simpson said.

We suggest the PUD Commissioners look at the migration from gasoline to electricity as major transportation fuel as an opportunity to increase PUD revenues and decrease money leaving the community through gasoline expenditures.  No gasoline or diesel is created in Clallam County, whereas there are over 750 roof top solar arrays producing clean electricity.  Expansions in electrical generation will result in positive local economic activity and prevent money leaving the community for polluting fossil fuels.  The increased revenues can be re-invested in our public electrical infrastructure.  The PUD’s job is to help navigate to a more advantageous position in a cleaner future, not to oppose any change due to fear of increased costs without a vision of the benefits of capturing more of the energy economy locally.

We see many benefits of cutting out petroleum and carbon based industries, while capturing those revenues locally and building a cleaner future.  This is the reason we stand with hundreds of businesses, tribes, unions, and faith-based organizations in favor of 1631.  Learn more about this initiative here http://yeson1631.org

Why is Clallam PUD siding with the petroleum industry in opposition to a carbon fee?  Could they better represent their ratepayers by focusing on the most beneficial way to move forward toward a cleaner future?

Also of interest:

Exposing the oily lies of the oil industry

Union of Concerned Scientists debunks false claims of the I-1631 opposition

WA Budget & Policy Center debunks opposition’s outrageous cost estimates

Comprehensive analysis by the Sightline Institute

Analysis by sustainable energy engineer Greg Rock

1631 would keep billions of dollars from bleeding out-of-state

Bill Gates: Why I’m for Washington state’s carbon fee

Olympian editorial: If not now, when?

Debate on I-1631 on KING-5 TV

Issues Plague Industry Study on 1631