Tag Archives: election

OCA members have their say

Now that most of the dust has cleared on the 2018 election, OCA members should be acknowledged for having their say about climate in the public sphere. In these fractured times, there’s a need for citizens to state plain truths out loud, and OCA members are to be congratulated for stepping up to the democratic (small-d) plate.

Yes on I-1631:

Cindy Jayne in the Port Townsend Leader

Diane Lombardo in the Peninsula Daily News

Robert Sextro in the Peninsula Daily News

Dan Burdick in the Peninsula Daily News

Bob Vreeland in the Peninsula Daily News

Pat Milliren in the Peninsula Daily News

Judy d’Amore in the Peninsula Daily News

Melinda Gelder in the Peninsula Daily News

Clallam County Commissioner:

Jerry Estberg vs. Bill Peach on climate

Clallam County Public Utility District:

Paul Hansen for Jim Waddell

Richard deBusman for Jim Waddell

Carrol Hull for Jim Waddell

Brian Grad on embracing the future

R.I.P. Oil, Coal and Gas

The Midterms Have the Power to Usher in an Era of Climate Action

Trump and the fossil fuel lobby can stall for time. But change is coming faster than you think. ALEX STEFFEN

How you can help 1631 NOW

From 350.org:
  1. Sign up for a shift to knock doors or make phone calls near you with other Yes on 1631 volunteers — find the next event here. (If you can sign up for a volunteer shift, this is where the campaign needs you most!)
  2. Sign up here to call voters from the comfort of your home.
  3. Join us in texting voters. Sign up for a texting shift here.
  4. Spread the word by emailing your friends using Voter Circle, a simple tool that lets you send personalized messages to friends who are registered to vote in Washington.

Poll: 1631 has Big Oil on the ropes!

This Elway poll has some good news for making carbon polluters accountable:

https://crosscut.com/2018/10/poll-nations-first-carbon-fee-leading-among-voters

This poll shows that:
 
1) I-1631 is leading among voters, and it’s clear that Washingtonians don’t trust big oil despite their $21 million in fancy advertising.
 
2) This election is going to be close, but we CAN win and defeat big oil and their money.
 
3) Undecided voters will come down to who they trust, and every conversation we have with our neighbors, our friends, and at the doors we knock on is essential to help us win.
 
This is a moment for us all to step up.  We have a lot of work to do in the next 25 days to connect with voters and remind them of the vision we all share for this state. With your help and all of our hard work, we can do this!

We can’t do this without YOU. Here are some of the ways you can help: 

Volunteer door knock – It is powerful democracy in action!  Big Oil is already spending more than $20 million to defeat us, but we have the Power of the People.  Please sign up for a shift here.

Calling voters who might need a nudge to vote – this is a huge priority for the campaign, and we need lots of help. We need to ensure these registered voters turn in their ballots. Here is the link for you to schedule yourself for a phonebanking shift (Human-to-human calls are a very powerful tool!) Here is the link to our dialer toolkit.  If you want to call from downtown Seattle this link has all of Washington Environmental Council’s phone banks for 1631, Sunday-Thursday.

Texting – We are doing texts to help Get Out The Vote. You can sign up for a texting shift here.

Small Business Endorsements -Do you know a small business owner you can ask? Maybe your favorite coffee shop? If you get a yes, be sure to fill out this form and we can get them a sign for their window.

If you want to help in a more substantial way by volunteering full or part time for the campaign, let me know! Or if you can host an organizer from out of town, please sign up here.

Go here to learn more about the YES on 1631 campaign, and its endorsers.

We Can. We Must. We Will!

Candidate forums available online

Candidate Forum videos are going up on Peninsula Area Public Access’s YouTube channel as they become available. If you have not had a chance to see the candidates speak in person, check these out! Here is a link where you can check periodically to see when one a new comes online:

Peninsula Area Public Access – YouTube

Primary ballots went into the mail today!

Ask your candidates about climate

With primary election season coming around, it’s time to exercise your democratic muscles and get involved! One way is to inform yourself (and others) about the candidates’ views on climate change and what to do about it. As has been noted elsewhere on this site, individual acts of conscience will simply not be sufficient to avert a catastrophic climate crisis in the coming decades; therefore we must muster the political will to take collective action, and that is what politics is supposed to be about.

Questions to ask local candidates about climate

League of Women Voters candidate forums: July 16 in Port Angeles; July 18 in Forks

League of Women Voters candidate forum in Port Ludlow: Wednesday, July 18, 6-8 p.m. will bring together candidates for Jefferson County Commissioner, District 3: Greg Brotherton, Jon Cooke, Ryan McAllister and Craig Durgan at the Beach Club at Port Ludlow, 121 Marina View Drive .

Many civic groups, such as Norwester Rotary, the Port Angeles Business Association, and the American Association of University Women, also sponsor candidate forums–check their social media for schedules.

Vote!  Our future depends on it!

Paul Krugman makes clear how crucial this election is to the fate of our climate.  He’s talking at the national level, but that’s true at all levels.

OCA endorses these state initiatives:

I-732 would put a tax on carbon that would be balanced by reductions in other state taxes plus a Working Families Tax Rebate.

I-735 would put Washington state on record as calling for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution overturning Citizens United and reducing the power of money in politics.

I-1464 would implement a number of state reforms to level the playing field for candidates and increase transparency in campaign contributions.

OCA doesn’t endorse candidates, but we encourage people to study candidates’ views on climate:

Presidential candidates’ views on climate change

State and local races:  the League of Women Voters’ Vote 411 provides a guide to candidates’ positions, including on climate.

Clallam County Commissioner:  a question about climate change was posed during the League of Women Voters debate.

Jefferson County races:  several forums are collected here.