Tag Archives: climate action plan

1631 opponents: Make good on your word

“Opponents argued a better proposal was needed. They must now stand by their word in calling for a better proposal.”

Note from the chart below that Jefferson and Clallam Counties generated some of the highest percentages of Yes votes on 1631! Kudos to all who helped spread the word about the need for substantive, immediate climate action.

From CarbonWA: Initiative 1631 Falls Short

We applaud the immense effort made by 1631 campaign volunteers and staff. However, the initiative has fallen short of passing. Here is our statement on the result:

There is mounting evidence that a growing majority of Americans are concerned about climate change and support climate action. While Initiative 1631 failed to attract majority support, that does not change the fact that Yale University’s extensive research shows 70 percent of Washington voters believe global warming is happening and would support regulations on carbon emissions. Voters are demanding a solution, even if they didn’t accept this one. I-1631 deserves praise for attracting a broad coalition of support, including from Carbon Washington. Yet the policy failed to attract bipartisan support and contained elements that caused concern, as we highlighted in our analysis of the proposal. Opponents argued a better proposal was needed. They must now stand by their word in calling for a better proposal.

Carbon Washington will continue to advocate for solutions that bridge our deep partisan divides, not enlarge them, and that are effective, equitable and economically sound. But, we cannot do this work alone. We urge everyone, Republicans and Democrats, energy companies and community activists, opponents and proponents of 1631, to join us in the spirit of compromise to find solutions that fulfill our duty to protect our common home. Read our full statement here

We’ll continue to analyze the results and look for insights. However, one supporter created this chart comparing I-732 to the first round of results from I-1631.

1631 vote % by county

The Future of Climate Action

The climate movement needs solutions that can bring people together across regional, political, and economic divides. Strategies that hinge on ‘overwhelming’ the other side cannot be counted on to succeed. At CarbonWA, we will continue to advocate for a price on carbon because it is the most efficient tool we have to reduce carbon emissions. A campaign outcome doesn’t change that reality. We will invite the traditional opponents of climate action to join the discussion to shape the path forward. We will pursue other climate policies in the upcoming legislative session as well. Our work on land-use climate solutions, like carbon sequestration and biochar, will continue. We support efforts for a low carbon fuel standard regionally and in the legislature. Some of our partners are pushing for 100% clean energy, and we will look for cost-effective ways we can decarbonize our electricity system toward that goal. Stay tuned and expect to hear about opportunities to support our ambitious legislative campaigns.

If you want to be a part of this work, please let us know. We need talented, engaged volunteers to join our legislative committee, communications team, and fundraising committee.

Like what you’re reading? Help us continue to represent your views and give you the straight scoop on what’s happening. Your donation will multiply our effectiveness.

-The CarbonWA Team

Port Angeles commits to a climate plan

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/port-angeles-aims-for-climate-plan-in-2019/

In a 6-0 vote, the Port Angeles City Council at its meeting on 6/19/18 committed to devising a climate action plan in 2019 with help from a citizens’ committee.

Council member Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin noted that Port Angeles has heard from citizens [including OCA members] for many years on this issue, with little response, and has missed out on funding opportunities because of its lack of a climate action plan.

Port Angeles Community and Economic Development Director Nathan West committed City staff to full engagement in this process in 2019, noting a full plate of commitments already in place for 2018.

Schromen-Wawrin suggested that “we do this collaboratively with community stakeholders taking the lead with support from city staff and council.”

Once again, local communities are stepping in where the federal government has failed to act.

Clallam County Commissioners unanimously pass climate resolution

At their June 19th meeting, the Clallam County Board of Commissioners unanimously adopted Resolution 2018-62, reinvigorating planning and action on climate, shepherded by Commissioner Mark Ozias.

In this resolution, the Commissioners note local impacts of climate change including “increased likelihood of storm surge and coastal flooding…low snowpack resulting in drought and water shortages…major fires…advance of invasive species, and ocean acidification.”

Clallam County had previously passed a Climate Action Plan in 2009, calling for an 80% reduction in greenhouse-gas emissions from County government operations by 2050, and a climate-preparedness resolution in 2016, but neither has led to significant action in recent years.  This resolution puts life back into County action on climate by:

  • Focusing on land-use planning via the County Comprehensive Plan
  • Updating the County’s 2009 Climate Action Plan and putting wheels under it
  • Engaging the broader community in a conversation about climate change and what to do about it at the local level.

OCA member Bob Sextro spoke in favor, saying, “The past 30 years have been very kind to us on climate change; the next 30 years probably won’t be. This resolution will help the County continue the dialogue, continue the action, and move forward.”

Thanks to Commissioner Ozias, the other Commissioners, and the OCA members who helped shape this resolution and move it forward. We look forward to working with the Commissioners and the community on these issues.

Clallam County Commissioners to consider climate resolution

At their regular meeting of June 19, 2018, starting at 10 a.m., the Clallam County Board of Commissioners will consider a resolution long in the making, shepherded by Commissioner Mark Ozias, to reinvigorate a Climate Action Plan passed in 2009. The draft of the resolution is here.

Passage of this important resolution is not guaranteed; your input may help sway the Board of Commissioners to support it. You can provide input:

  • In person, at the beginning or end of the meeting (agenda here–please note the instructions for speaking given at the end), limiting your comments to three minutes.
  • In writing, either by presenting it to the Clerk of the Board prior to or at the meeting (where you can also read it aloud), or by sending an email to the Commissioners by the prior business day.

BACKGROUND: Clallam County passed a Climate Action Plan in 2009, and a climate-preparedness resolution was passed in 2016 with OCA support, but neither has led to significant action in recent years.  Commissioner Ozias hopes to put life back into the CAP to quantify the actions the county needs to take and to engage citizens in dialogue about their concerns related to climate impacts and mitigation.

GUIDELINES FOR COMMENTS:

  • Speak from your own experience:  Why are you concerned about climate change? What would you like to see County government do about it?
  • The resolution itself has great talking points and is a good place to start.
  • It’s helpful if you can think of ideas that will motivate individual council members to pass the resolution and implement the CAP. In what various ways will the resolution help their constituents?
  • Commissioner Ozias reported that many County department heads are anxious to investigate ways they can help the county save money and reduce our carbon footprint. Getting climate back on the agenda should help to serve both goals.

Climate change is going to occur no matter what we do, but planning ahead can minimize its severity and maximize our resiliency.  Let’s do our part here to come to grips with this reality.

OCA endorses I-1631; time to gather signatures!

State initiative would put a fee on carbon and devote the proceeds to clean energy and climate protection

At its April 2018 monthly meeting, Olympic Climate Action (OCA) agreed by consensus to endorse I-1631, the Protect Washington Act initiative. OCA joins Sierra Club, The Nature Conservancy, Washington Audubon, a coalition of Native American tribes and 200 other statewide organizations in our endorsement.

We cannot continue to treat our atmosphere as a sewer without incurring a deadly cost, one much greater than the cost of an emissions fee.

We must collect 270,000 signatures statewide by the end of June to get this initiative on the ballot, and residents of the Olympic Peninsula must do our part. To help this signature-gathering campaign, contact:

Links for more information:

Clallam County considers climate action

At their work session on 2/12/18, the Board of Clallam County Commissioners discussed a resolution proposed by Commissioner Mark Ozias for Clallam County to take further steps to mitigate and adapt to climate change.

Clallam County residents are urged to communicate with their Commissioners about this resolution. Public comment of a general nature is taken at the end of Tuesday weekly Commissioner meetings, which usually end in the late morning; or you can write to them at commissioners@co.clallam.wa.us.

Michael Clemens, who facilitates OCA’s Climate Action Planning committee, made this comment in support of the resolution at the regular Commissioners meeting on 2/13/18. If you’d like to join Michael’s committee, contact us.

BackgroundOCA presented these recommendations to the Clallam Commissioners on 5/1/17:

Clallam County should renew its commitment to climate action in several ways:

  1. Take steps to adapt to the unavoidable impacts of climate change, as the Board of Commissioners committed to in Resolution 27 of 2016.
  2. Take steps to minimize emissions of greenhouse gases, as described in the Board of Commissioners’ adopted Climate Action Plan of 2009, and broaden the approach to address the carbon footprint of the county as a whole, not simply County government.
  3. Include means for priority-setting, evaluation and adaptive management.
  4. Encourage cooperation among multiple players in the county, including cities, Port, PUD, College, tribes, as well as Jefferson County, perhaps using the North Olympic Development Council as a vehicle.
  5. Move forward via a combined effort of County government, other entities, and committed citizens.
  6. Look for innovative and integrated approaches to addressing climate change, by addressing community resiliency, public safety, energy, transportation, future infrastructure needs, economic development and other challenges together.

Ozias commits to climate action

At Tuesday’s Clallam County Commissioner meeting, Commissioner Mark Ozias committed to taking further steps with his fellow Commissioners in 2017 to prepare for climate change and reduce Clallam County’s climate impact.

“I’m looking forward to moving into next year with a much more firm sense of where we’re at and where we would like to go,” Ozias said.

We thank Commissioner Ozias for his leadership on this vital community issue and look forward to working with the Commissioners and others in 2017.

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/clallam-county-looks-at-climate-change-plans/