Tag Archives: native Amercans

Welcome to nəxʷsƛ̕áy̕əm Territory – Peninsula College – Thursday, Sept. 27

Studium Generale will open its fall season with a presentation that has become an annual event but with an important change to the title. Instead of the English language, the Klallam/S’Klallam language will take precedence. “Welcome to nəxʷsƛ̕áy̕əm Territory” will begin at 12:35 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, in Peninsula College’s Little Theater in Port Angeles, followed by a reception in ʔaʔk̓ʷustəƞáwt̓xʷ House of Learning, Peninsula College Longhouse. This is an opportunity for people to gain a deeper understanding of the culture and history of this area and to know that these are traditional Klallam and S’Klallam lands. All tribal members and the general public are invited to attend the event, along with the Peninsula College community. Leaders from the Port Gamble S’Klallam, Jamestown S’Klallam and Lower Elwha Klallam Tribes will offer their expertise on a number of related topics. All are invited to a reception in ʔaʔk̓ʷustəƞáwt̓xʷ House of Learning, Peninsula College Longhouse, directly following the presentation. The first longhouse built on a community college campus, ʔaʔk̓ʷustəƞáwt̓xʷ was named in nəxʷsƛ̕áy̕əmucen the Klallam/S’Klallam language because of its location on the traditional territory of the Klallam and S’Klallam people. This longhouse was designed and built through partnerships with six area tribes including the Hoh, Makah, and Quileute tribes, as well as the Klallam/S’Klallam tribes whose language, history, and culture we honor and celebrate in this “Welcome”.

Both events are free and open to the public. Please follow the link for campus map and visitor parking pass. http://pencol.edu/sites/default/files/PC-Campus-Map-Parking-Pass-I.pdf

 

 

 

Tribes uniting to support I-1631

http://knkx.org/post/pacific-northwest-tribes-pushing-climate-action-launch-new-political-action-committee

A new coalition of tribal leaders, The First American Project, has come together to promote policies that protect the environment and human rights, and their first order of business is to pass I-1631, which would put a price on carbon in the effort to slow global warming.

Theresa Sheldon, a member of the coalition and former councilwoman with the Tulalip Tribes, says the people of Washington State “can show the country how we can make that difference for Mother Earth – and for all of our children who have yet to come – to ensure that they actually have rivers they can swim in, that they can fish in; air they can breathe in.”

On the board of the First American Project is chairwoman Frances Charles of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe.

First in, last out

“The art of communion with the earth we can relearn from the Indian. Thus a reverse dependence is established. Survival in the future will likely depend more on our learning from the Indian than the Indian’s learning from us. In some ultimate sense we need their mythic capacity for relating to this continent more than they need our capacity for mechanistic exploitation of the continent.”   — Thomas Berry, The Dream of the Earth