Tag Archives: orcas

Artifishal

Patagonia’s founder, Yvon Chouinard,
has followed his 2014 documentary DamNation
with a new film:

Artifishal is a film about people, rivers, and the fight for the future of wild fish and the environment that supports them. It explores wild salmon’s slide toward extinction, threats posed by fish hatcheries and fish farms, and our continued loss of faith in nature.

Sign the Petition for the Salmon
See the interview with Patagonia’s founder, Yvon Chouinard

Get the Facts

  • What’s The Difference Between Wild, Hatchery And Farmed Fish?
  • Don’t We Need Hatcheries To Make Up For Habitat Loss?
  • How Can Putting More Fish In The River Result In Fewer Fish To Catch?
  • Who Pays For And Manages Fish Hatcheries?
  • What About Tribal Fishing Rights?
  • If We’re Serious About Helping Wild Salmon And Orcas Survive In Puget Sound, What’s The Solution?
  • But Wouldn’t More Hatchery Fish Provide Immediate Relief For Starving Orcas?
  • How Can We Help Klamath River Wild Salmon Recover After The Dams Are Removed?
  • Can I Eat Salmon Without Supporting Hatcheries And Net-Pen Fish Farms?
  • How Quickly Can Wild Fish Recover When We Restore Habitat And Remove Hatcheries And Dams?
  • Won’t Fewer Hatcheries Mean Fewer Fishing Opportunities?

“Most sadly three more Blackfish just starved to death.”

Says Paul Chiyokten Wagner:
“I believe the sacred words of our
ancestors. Duwamish prophecy: “If the Blackfish were ever to be absent from the Salish Sea, so would the humans
be absent from the land”.
Most sadly three more Blackfish
just starved to death.

We can do this together my family, rise up, make yourself strong for all of the
children of Mother Earth
and their livable future.
O si,am”


One whale from each pod of the
Southern Resident killer whales
has been determined dead by the
Center for Whale Research.

Author: KING5 Staff Published: 08/08/19

Three more Southern Resident killer whales have been determined dead by the Center for Whale Research. That brings their total population down to 73. 
The deceased orcas are J17, K25, and L84; that’s one killer whale from each pod of the resident orcas. 

Continue reading

Dammed to Extinction — July 11, 2019

This inspiring film reveals the obvious way to stop decades of ever increasing
ecological devastation and financial misappropriation.

RSVP Donations at Evenbright

Sign the Petition to Breach the Dams

View on Facebook Events


About this Event

As the salmon numbers plummet and orcas starve, weak political will remains the status quo. Four obsolete dams on the lower Snake River kill hundreds of salmon per every megawatt of hydropower produced. These fish killing dams never were an environmentally friendly decision, and with renewable resources on the rise are no longer economically sound. Breaching these dams will not only save salmon and orca, but millions of taxpayer and ratepayer dollars.

You will also hear the story of a Palouse tribal elder from eastern Washington who courageously refuses to let the injustice of constructing the dams go untold. Carrie Chapman Nightwalker Schuster’s family home was drowned by the construction of Ice Harbor Dam, completed in 1961. Since her childhood she has fought valiantly to maintain and restore Palouse culture, language, and land, some of which lies under the reservoir behind Ice Harbor Dam. Carrie gives the vision of steadfast grit to all who take up the mission to “Free the Snake.”

Rise for The Orca Tour

Dana Lyons

June 8th – 7-9 p.m. at Sequim’s Pioneer Park
387 East Washington Street

Dana Lyons with an inspiring musical message of hope
for the Orca to help save
the Southern Resident Killer Whales
from extinction.

Dana has invited the North Olympic Orca Pod to dance,
and specifically the “Stayin’ Alive” number,
which Dana will play and have the lyrics for.

Suggested donation is $10-20 — No one will be turned away

See Dana perform “The Great Salish Sea”CowsWithGuns.com

Tokitae in Miami Seaquarium

By Emi Okikawa, Digital Communications Fellow

From The Sierra Club, Washington State Chapter Journal – “The Crest” Volume 38, Issue 1

The Story of Tokitae

Three thousand miles away from Seattle,
a lone Southern Resident orca swims in a tank. To visitors at Miami Seaquarium
her name is “Lolita,” but to the Lummi Nation she is Tokitae. It’s a Chinook
name, given to her the day she was kidnapped from our waters.

At 51 years old, Tokitae has spent the majority of her life–47 years– in
captivity, confined to a tiny swimming pool with no other orca for company. She
is the age of an elder matriarch and should be the mother of her own family. But
instead, she is all alone.

Tokitae was taken from her family in the infamous Penn Cove capture of 1970.
In the brutal attack, a group of men used boats, planes, and explosives to
corral frightened and panicked orca families into nets to separate them, using
long sticks to push mothers away from their calves. In the end, the remaining
orca could only watch as their stolen babies and relatives were helicoptered
away to be distributed to various marine parks around the country. According to
the Lummi, the orca have since avoided Penn Cove because it’s still the site of
such painful memories.

Continue reading

Two worthy events this weekend

Orca forum Friday 1-4 pm in Port Angeles

Celebrate science & technology Saturday at PA City Pier

Can our Orcas be saved? – forum Friday

Orca Forum in Port Angeles Friday, May 10, 2019

The Marine Resources Committee (MRC) of Clallam County invites you to attend a free public forum about Southern Resident Orca Whales at the Lower Elwha Heritage Center, Port Angeles on May 10 from 1 to 4pm. Four members from the Governor’s Orca Recovery Task Force will highlight the current status of our Southern Resident Orcas, and some of the Task Force recommendations.
Specifically, they will discuss how the decreasing availability of Chinook salmon is impacting our orcas, the need to reduce toxins in our waters, funding for continuing restoration efforts, and how we can reduce noise or acoustic disturbance affecting the whales. The Forum is supported by the Northwest Straits Foundation and is funded by a grant from the Olympic Peninsula Visitor Bureau and a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Killer Whale Research and Conservation Program, which is supported by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, SeaWorld, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Shell Oil Company. Panelists include:
• Dr. Rich Osborne, Whale Museum/Soundwatch/UW; Washington Coast Sustainable Salmon Partnership board, Science Seat on the Washington Coastal Marine Advisory Council; member of Governor Inslee’s Orca Recovery Task Force
• Dr. Todd Hass, Chair, Puget Sound Partnership, Vessels Task Force Lead; member of Governor Inslee’s Orca Recovery Task Force
• Dr. Scott Veirs, Chair, Puget Sound ecosystem monitoring program (PSEMP) Marine Mammal Work Group; member of Governor Inslee’s Orca Recovery Task Force
• Donna Sandstrom, Founder and Executive Director of The Whale Trail; member of Governor Inslee’s Orca Recovery Task Force and Vessel Impacts Working Group
Facilitation by Anne Murphy, President, Northwest Straits Foundation

Where: Elwha Heritage Center (401 E 1st St, Port Angeles, WA 98362)
When: 1-4 pm May 10, 2019
Cost: Free Space is limited and pre-registration is recommended by contacting Helle Andersen at handersen@co.clallam.wa.us.