Category Archives: Actions

Actions you can take to address the climate crisis

Get the money out–yes on I-735

for-a-brief-moment

wamend.org/

facebook.com/WAmend.org

twitter.com/WAmend_I735

Register to Vote Today

OCA endorses these state initiatives:

I-732–a revenue-neutral carbon tax

I-735–calling for a constitutional amendment to enable better regulation of campaign finance

Sequim adopts sustainability resolution

Belated kudos to the City of Sequim!  This is a far-sighted resolution unanimously adopted on July 25 calling for incorporating climate into all planning instruments, working with other regional parties, learning and educating, and monitoring and evaluating.  Thanks to OCA members Bob Sextro and Brian Grad, who testified before the City Council.

Here is the resolution:  sequim-sustainability-resolution-2016

I-732 will benefit Clallam County $$$

In a presentation to the Dungeness River Management Team, CarbonWA executive board member Mike Massa made the case for the I-732 revenue-neutral carbon tax and refuted the statements that the Clallam County PUD had made opposing the initiative at a previous DRMT meeting.  Here are his slides in Powerpoint and PDF format.

Note the projected economic impacts:

Continue reading

Raves for I-732 and putting a fair price on carbon

“If there was one thing I would like to see, it would be for us to be able to price the cost of carbon emissions.”

* That’s President Obama responding to a question from Thomas Friedman about the single most important thing we can do to solve climate change, from a forthcoming episode in the new season of Years of Living Dangerously, which will begin airing in October and which focuses on their new #PutAPriceOnIt campaign.  That episode will feature Carbon Washington and I-732.

More raves:

LOCAL I-732 events today!

Help bring a carbon tax to WA!

At 2:45 today at the Dungeness River Audubon Center, Mike Massa of the CarbonWA executive board will give a presentation on I-732 to the Dungeness River Management Team, refuting the misleading statements made by the Clallam County PUD in opposition to the initiative.  A public comment period will follow at the end of the meeting.  Please attend if you can, and say at least a few words in support at the end of the meeting, and help introduce Mike to local people after the meeting.

This evening, we’ll gather starting at 5:30 at the home of Brian Grad at 245 Jake Way in Carlsborg, for food, drink (feel free to bring potluck items), and strategizing about the local I-732 campaign.  Please attend this important meeting.

If not us, who?

If not now, when?

If not this, what?

In the spirit, Ed Chadd, Mike Massa, and Brian Grad

PUD Commissioners:  fulfill your mission and support I-732

“We are disappointed that the Clallam County PUD Board of Commissioners voted against supporting Initiative 732, a measure designed to accelerate the switch to affordable clean energy.”

In a guest opinion piece in the Sequim Gazette, OCA members collaborated on a response and appeal to the Clallam County Public Utility District Commissioners to rescind their opposition to the Carbon Tax Initiative, I-732.  The main points:

  • Most Clallam residents will keep more money in their pockets with I-732.
  • I-732 will help the PUD meet its state and federal regulatory mandates.
  • Most importantly, I-732 will curb fossil fuel pollution which contributes to climate change, a problem with serious social and economic consequences for Clallam County–winter floods, summer drought, wildfire, sea-level rise, and ocean acidification among them.

The piece concludes:  “We have a responsibility to protect our children and future generations from these dangerous and costly threats to our community. With I-732, we can reduce taxes while protecting the environment. We urge the Clallam PUD commissioners to support I-732 and fulfill their mission to provide reliable, efficient, safe and low cost utility services in a financially and environmentally responsible manner.”

Catastrophic weather events seem to capture more headlines with each passing year–including events which have cut off power or water to PUD customers.  The time for “business as usual” is past.  We will continue to educate the PUD Commissioners and PUD customers about the advantages of I-732 to our community, our state, our nation, and the world at large.  Climate change is not going away, and these issues aren’t either–in fact, they become more compelling with each passing day.

Pacific NW activists call for a clean break from fossil fuels

OCA participates in regional action in Anacortes

Part of a global wave of resistance to keep coal, oil & gas in the ground

May 13-15, 2016: A global wave of mass actions targeted the world’s most dangerous fossil fuel projects, in order to keep coal, oil and gas in the ground and accelerate the just transition to 100% renewable energy.

With bodies out in the streets, activists around the world called for strong follow-up to the Paris COP21 talks, to shift power from the fossil fuel industry towards grassroots groups working toward an economic and energy transformation of our society.

The Anacortes protest was held at the site of the Shell and Tesoro refineries, the largest source of carbon pollution in the Pacific Northwest.  With the plumes of the refineries swirling all around, a broad coalition of activists, including more than a dozen OCA members, called for a just transition to 100% renewable energy.

Report from the Anacortes Break Free event

Diane Vendiola, Swinomish elder:  these lands were ours

Sequim Gazette article about OCA’s participation in Break Free

The time is now for a just transition to clean energy

Eight ways we can break free from fossil fuels

OCA responds to PUD misstatements about I-732

On May 9, members of OCA presented this statement to Clallam County PUD commissioners regarding their ill-considered opposition to I-732, the state carbon-tax initiative that will be on the ballot in November.

In spite of substantive refutations from OCA, OCA members, and a representative from the I-732 campaign, pointing out that I-732 will have very little economic impact on Clallam County and will help rather than hurt those most strapped to pay their electric bills, the PUD commissioners passed their anti-732 resolution anyway.

OCA will continue to educate the PUD commissioners and the public on these issues.  Sitting back and doing nothing will not make the climate crisis go away.

OCA comments on Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan

Urges consideration of climate change in guiding the City’s future

OCA delivered these comments to the Port Angeles Planning Commission, which is charged with taking public input and drafting a periodic required update of the Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan.  This plan guides decision-making of the City as it strives to meet its mission to enhance the quality of life of its citizens, now and into the future.

OCA members believe it is critically important for the City to come to grips with climate change, both to help mitigate its impacts and to proactively deal with the impacts we will not be able to avoid.  Going into the future, we can expect longer and more intense fire seasons, droughts, and floods, as well as sea level rise and ocean acidification.  Now is not the time to put our head in the sand and pretend nothing is happening.  While this past year of drought, wildfire, flood damage, and the dead zone off our coast was an anomaly, it was a good illustration of what the climate models predict for our area in the coming decades.

Fortunately, our area has been able to complete a scientifically rigorous and community-based Climate Preparedness Plan recently published by the NOP Resource Conservation & Development council, with help from community groups such as OCA.  This plan can serve as an excellent guide to our community as to how best to prepare for what’s to come.

One quick way to show your support for a proactive climate stance in the City’s Comp Plan is to answer their short survey:  “Speak Up PA!” Questionnaire.

Break free from fossil fuels!

Actions in the Pacific Northwest will focus on Anacortes, May 13-15

Join a global wave of resistance to keep coal, oil & gas in the ground

May 13-15, 2016: A global wave of mass actions will target the world’s most dangerous fossil fuel projects, in order to keep coal, oil and gas in the ground and accelerate the just transition to 100% renewable energy.

*** Sequim Gazette article about OCA’s participation in Break Free ***

We need to follow up the Paris COP21 talks with a strong call to get serious and break free from this perilous path we’re on, and we can’t afford to go down that path any more.  It’s time to turn the ship around and head for a livable future, and this is a time to make the point with our bodies in the streets, to shift power from the fossil fuel industry towards grassroots groups like OCA who are working toward a great economic and energy transformation of our society.

The Shell and Tesoro refineries near Anacortes, WA are the largest source of carbon pollution in the Northwest and refine 47% of all the gas and diesel consumed in the region; this system must change—within years, not decades.  Join us the weekend of May 13-15 as we take mass action to Break Free from Big Oil and hasten a just transition to 100% renewable energy.

In order to arrange appropriate transportation and accommodation, we need your prompt response as to whether/how/when you would like to join us for this event, so we can minimize our carbon footprint and make it a good experience for all.  We expect to be picking up folks in Port Angeles, Sequim, and Port Townsend on the way to Anacortes.  Transportation might be by carpools, vans, or even buses.

PLEASE fill out this survey so we can arrange logistics and stay in touch: 

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/NBFDR2P

Clallam commissioners adopt climate change work plan

(Peninsula Daily News 4/12/16) PORT ANGELES — Clallam County commissioners have approved a work plan to adapt to potential impacts of climate change.

After hearing testimony from a split group of public speakers Tuesday, county commissioners voted 3-0 to pass a resolution directing six county departments to consider impacts and strategies contained in a North Olympic Peninsula Resources Conservation and Development Council report on climate change.

“The point of this resolution is to try and give our county staff some tools to try and plan for the future,” Commissioner Mark Ozias said.

(Full article here.)

To view the Climate Change Preparedness Plan for the North Olympic Peninsula, go to www.tinyurl.com/PDN-climatechangereport.

Legislators:  Act on I-732!

Thanks to individuals and groups such as OCA across the state, the CarbonWA revenue-neutral carbon tax initiative 732 has met its signature threshold and stands before the state legislature, who can either enact it, propose their own version, or pass it on to the voters untouched.  OCA, with the consensus of our membership, has sent this letter to the legislators from the 24th District in support of CarbonWA.  We await their attention to this matter of utmost import to our state, nation, and planet.  Please consider sending a letter of your own, so Washington State can step on up into a clean-energy future!

Letters can be addressed as follows:

Senator Jim Hargrove:  hargrove.jim@leg.wa.gov or PO Box 40424, Olympia 98504-0424

Representative Kevin Van de Wege:  vandewege.kevin@leg.wa.gov or PO Box 40600, Olympia 98504-0600

Representative Steve Tharinger:  steve.tharinger@leg.wa.gov or PO Box 40600, Olympia 98504-0600

OCA Reacts to COP21

At the end of the Paris Conference of Parties meeting #21 on Dec. 12, spontaneous celebrations around the globe marked the mood of relief that political leaders from 187 countries had just agreed to acknowledge responsibility for turning the climate change ship around. The significance of this agreement at the two-week COP21 climate summit in Paris cannot be overstated. Given the goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, the smart money will now bet on clean energy for future investment.

Locally, Olympic Climate Action (OCA) members are having a mixed reaction but all are proud to have rallied two weeks ago—when COP21 began—in support of a strong outcome. Here are some reactions from OCA members:

Ida Fintel: Worldwide political agreement would have been impossible even 10 years ago!

Anita Matthay: I’m encouraged that leaders not only agreed to hold global warming to 2 degrees—but they agreed to set the target for 1½ degrees. This is a very good sign.

Janet Marx: Although there is much to clarify and define in the future, we finally have agreement among developed and developing countries with high CO2 emissions and poor countries who suffer the most from climate change.

Ed Chadd: American leadership surpassed that which had been shown at prior conferences, and was probably as much as we can expect given the makeup of our current Congress, which attempted to undercut American leadership every step of the way.

Bob Sextro: While solid progress was made in Paris, the real test will be the follow-up meetings that the parties agreed to in 2018 and 2020.

David James: Politics aside, it will be years before anyone can assess whether Paris was the beginning of a real effort to confront climate change or a stupid waste of time. By 2050, when we are to be carbon neutral, there will be at least 2.3 billion more people on the planet clamoring for energy. So, if you have been paddling, paddle harder.

Brian Grad: The issue of ‘Climate Change Reparations’ may never be resolved to everyone’s satisfaction, so it remains to be seen if any agreement will continue to move the investment needle towards the green side of the dial. That is why groups like OCA must continue our work to keep promoting a vision of clean, sustainable energy for now and in our future.

While a scent of relief is in the air, OCA sees the need for continued activism:
• To get elected officials on board to solve the climate crisis or to elect those who will.
• To switch from incentives for fossil fuels to incentives for clean energy.
• To put a price on greenhouse-gas pollution.
• To push for adoption and implementation of the North Olympic Peninsula climate action plans already available and more ambitious plans going forward.

Climate rally Nov. 29 in Port Townsend

With so much at stake in the upcoming COP21 talks in Paris, climate activists around the world are demanding a global commitment to keep 80 percent of remaining fossil fuels in the ground and transition to 100 percent renewable energy by 2050.  OCA hosted a rally in Port Angeles on Nov. 21 and Port Townsend will host one on Nov. 29:

PORT TOWNSEND RALLY AT HALLER FOUNTAIN – November 29, 3-4 pm

Join the Green Sanctuary Committee, PT Songlines and friends as we celebrate the miracle of life and our commitment to leave a livable planet for future generations. This Global Climate March with 1,000,000 others around the world will demand that our leaders make a major commitment in Paris next month to preserve our environment and promote climate justice. Bring signs, songs, flags and sidewalk chalk (in solidarity with Paris). Ride a bike, bus or walk if you can and let’s push leaders our leaders to commit to 100% clean energy for everyone. Help make history – RSVP at https://www.avaaz.org/en/event/globalclimatemarch/?slideshow. Just type in Port Townsend, get inspired and sign up.

Rally for climate action

“Put a Cork in It:  Leave Fossil Fuels in the Ground”

Saturday, Nov. 21, 12:15 pm

Port Angeles Boat Haven east entrance

With so much at stake in the upcoming COP21 talks in Paris, climate activists around the world are demanding a global commitment to keep 80 percent of remaining fossil fuels in the ground and transition to 100 percent renewable energy by 2050.  Here on the North Olympic Peninsula, we’ll gather on the Port Angeles waterfront with Shell’s “Polar Pioneer” drilling rig in the background, to send a message to world leaders in Paris that it’s time to “turn the ship around and leave the fuel in the ground.”  This rig recently returned to our harbor after a failed attempt to start a big drilling operation in the Arctic, in a place that wasn’t accessible until climate change melted the sea ice–an irony that seemed to be lost on Shell.
At the rally, we’ll hear about what’s at stake in Paris, talk about why we care, sing a few songs, and then take a group photograph holding a big cardboard cork positioned to look as if it’s capping the oil rig, with our message to “Put a Cork in It.”  The event will be kid-friendly, handicapped-accessible, on Bus Route 26 and the Waterfront Trail, and it should only last about a half hour, so you’ll still be able to make it to the Farmer’s Market.  If you so desire, bring an umbrella, a musical instrument, and a sign with your message to our world leaders.

Event signup link:

http://act.350.org/event/global-climate-march_attend/11719

Map wide

Plant-for-the-Planet Academy inducts new Climate Ambassadors

On October 24, Olympic Climate Action, Climate Change for Families, and 4-H of WSU Extension Clallam County hosted a Plant-for-the-Planet Academy with elementary and middle-school students.  Seven new Climate Ambassadors learned about the climate crisis, the distribution of wealth, population, and pollution around the world, Plant-for-the-Planet’s 3-point plan to solve the climate crisis, and how to become climate leaders, and they planted trees at the Port Angeles Boat Haven.  A good time was had by all.  Next step:  the students would like to form a club, and 4-H has offered to host the club if adult leaders can be found.  If you’d like to help lead a club with some wonderful young people, contact Jenny Schmidt at 4-H:  jenny.schmidt@wsu.edu.World GameRhetoric practiceSpeak for the TreesPlant it straight

Hands on

The candidates on climate

Ballots to be mailed Oct. 14

Here are the candidates for Clallam County Commissioner speaking on climate change:

League of Women Voters

Port Angeles Rotary Club

PA Chamber of Commerce

Help plan for global climate mobilization Sept. 26

OCA is sponsoring this event in conjunction with 350.org and other climate-action organizations worldwide.  This year’s climate talks in Paris will be crucial, and we need to join hands around the world to tell our leaders that it’s time to get off of fossil fuels and onto clean energy, now!

Power Through Paris Workshop
Saturday, September 26, 12:00-2:00 PM
Port Angeles Library, 2210 South Peabody Street, Port Angeles
This event is public.  Spread the word!

2015 is on track to be the hottest year in recorded history, and momentum is growing to stop the climate crisis. Political and religious leaders are beginning to get the message, but we need to carry the message home, to the global gathering of governments at the Paris climate change talks later this year — and beyond. Climate action groups are organizing events across the world in November and December, and in order to make them compelling we need everyone to work together.

The workshop, led by Olympic Climate Action, will help us share ideas, build energy, and lay out plans for “Power Through Paris”—including how to escalate through and after the Paris climate talks, regardless of their outcome.

OCA gathering signatures on I-732 & I-735

Promoting the CarbonWA carbon-tax initiative to bring clean energy to WA and the WAmend big-money-out-of-elections initiative to restore balance to our democracy.

OCA has sponsored several events centered around the CarbonWA initiative to enact a revenue-neutral tax swap which will tax “bads” (fossil fuels) instead of “goods” (sales, business activities, and working families).  Signature-gathering will continue through the end of November.
We are also gathering signatures on the I-735 WAmend initiative to get big money out of elections by calling for a constitutional amendment to say that corporations aren’t people and money isn’t speech, and that therefore corporate campaign contributions can be reined in.
We see these two issues as integrally related, as the fossil fuel industry has been instrumental in slowing action on climate change.  Contact us for petitions.
  • On July 30,  KONP Radio 1450 interviewed Yoram (yur-AHM) Bauman, the principal author of the I-732 CarbonWA initiative and the world’s only “Stand-Up Ph.D. Economist.”  Podcast this interview.
  • On August 2, Yoram presented “Climate Change–It’s No Joke:  An Evening of Fun, Fossil-Fuel
    Yoram Bauman

    Yoram Bauman

    Fungibility, and Fundraising.”  Poster  –  Video of Yoram’s talk

Legislators:  Continue the WA solarization program

Dear Senator Hargrove and Representatives Van de Wege and Tharinger:

We represent some 500 residents of the Olympic Peninsula, concerned about the impacts of climate change which are already affecting us all, and hoping to reduce our collective carbon footprint as much and as quickly as possible, as well as preparing for the impacts we cannot avoid.

In 2005 our legislators created a unique program to spur the development of solar energy industries here in Washington. Although it was slow to gain traction, it has become a success in the last five years, creating hundreds of jobs and supporting others during and after the recession.  For every dollar that is spent in this program, two and a half dollars are injected into the economy and clean power is generated that does not rely on snowpack or fossil fuels.

While the legislature has been working on the next budget, a group of stakeholders has been crafting a replacement solar program that has a reduced and declining cost, while still providing some incentive. As a group many of whose members have ‘gone solar’ and many more of whom would like to, we ask for your continued support of solar in Washington; let’s not lose the economic development and environmental gains that we have made.   The BPA Whitebook generation forecast predicts a significant reduction in power delivery in the coming years. We have a choice to either supplant that deficit by burning more carbon-based fuel or continuing to promote clean rooftop solar energy. There has been an intensified effort by the energy sector to limit or stifle the expansion of solar power.  Climate-denying groups such as ALEC have provided legislators and utility managers with data and a narrative to convince them that solar power co-generators are costing their other non-solar rate payers more money, and some utilities are using that argument to impose fees on individuals with solar installations. The truth is that supplanting the grid with clean power reduces the need to build more costly infrastructure and burn dirty fuel. Those are the costs that drive rate increases, not solar.  Moreover, there are significant externalized environmental costs which are borne by taxpayers and should not be ignored. Supporting solar power makes financial, technical and moral sense. We urge you to consider these factors and think of the future, moving toward a sustainable vision we can all live with.

This letter has been reviewed by our membership and approved without reservation.

Brian Grad and Ed Chadd, on behalf of

Olympic Climate Action

Citizens addressing the threat of climate change on the Olympic Peninsula
Clallam County, Washington State, U.S.A.

 

Collect signatures on two great initiatives: CarbonWA & WAmend

It’s important to shout out not only what we oppose (Shell Oil, Arctic drilling, coal & oil ports, secret trade agreements), but also what our positive vision is.

Luckily, a couple of state initiatives encapsulate that positive vision:  CarbonWA and WAmend.  OCA has committed to gather signatures on both.  Won’t you help?  Memorial Day pays tribute to those who gave their lives for freedom and to protect their loved ones, and what better way to live your life in their spirit than to get out on the street supporting those principles?

Our local WAmend organizer has posted this calendar/signup sheet on the Web:  http://www.huntcal.com/cal/view/MTA-Clallam/2014?vm=r.  There are plenty of good places and times to gather signatures, such as the farmers markets and libraries, but the main thing is to get out there and do it!

RSVP and we can get you petitions.

BTW, CarbonWA still needs a local coordinator…could it be you?

Here are some excellent links from CarbonWA founder Yoram Bauman about the impact of the CarbonWA carbon tax on revenue, business, and the climate:

The #1 Question from Conservatives about Revenue-Neutral Carbon Taxes

The #1 Question from Progressives about Revenue-Neutral Carbon Taxes

Carbon Pricing and Northwest Businesses

Three Things to Know About CarbonWA’s Revenue-Neutral Carbon Tax

sHellNo: Showdown in Seattle May 16-18

Members of Olympic Climate Action will participate in some of the activities planned in Seattle to protest the Shell Arctic drilling rig Polar Pioneer May 16-18.  Carpooling may be available; contact us for details. Shell acknowledges that human-caused climate change is a problem and that government sHellNoought to set a limit on carbon emissions.  Yet they spent $55 million on lobbying in the past five years, generally to protect their interests in oil.  They know the world can’t afford the consequences of burning the oil that would come out of the Arctic, even if they could guarantee that they can safely extract it.  Their rush to drill the Arctic is a cynical bid to pump the last dollar out of the ground, consequences be damned.  And the tiny financial blip caused by their rig in our harbor pales by comparison with the benefits to our local sHellNo.org_-e1428776506461economy of moving to clean energy, with an army of working people insulating buildings, selling efficient appliances, and installing heat pumps, solar panels, and electric-vehicle charging stations.sHellNo OCA PortOCall May 2015 Here is more information about Shell, Arctic drilling, and climate change published by OCA in the May 2015 PortOCall magazine: “Nickname the Rig” contest:  We held a contest to nickname Shell’s Polar Pioneer drilling rig, and the winner is…the No-Solar Profiteer!  Congratulations to OCA member Adrian Hoban, who wins a $10 gift certificate to the Port Angeles Farmers Market. Speaking of the Profiteer:  OCA has been invited to speak about the rig and the dangers it poses at the Clallam County Democratic Headquarters, 124-A West First Street, Port Angeles, on Wednesday, May 13, 6:00 – 7:30 pm.

sHellNo:  We Can Do Better than Drill the Arctic

Saturday, April 25, 10-2, Port Angeles Farmers Market, Front & Lincoln Streets

Members of Olympic Climate Action will be at the Port Angeles Farmers Market this Saturday to stand in opposition to the Shell oil drilling rig currently moored in Port Angeles Harbor.

Shell acknowledges that human-caused climate change is a problem and that government sHellNoought to set a limit on carbon emissions.  Yet they spent $55 million on lobbying in the past five years, generally to protect their interests in oil.  They know the world can’t afford the consequences of burning the oil that would come out of the Arctic, even if they could guarantee that they can safely extract it.  Their rush to drill the Arctic is a cynical bid to pump the last dollar out of the ground, consequences be damned.  And the tiny financial blip caused by their rig in our harbor pales by comparison with the benefits to our local sHellNo.org_-e1428776506461economy of moving to clean energy, with an army of working people insulating buildings, selling efficient appliances, and installing heat pumps, solar panels, and electric-vehicle charging stations.

OCA will share information about:

  •     The drilling history of Royal Dutch Shell
  •     The dangers of drilling for oil in the Arctic
  •     Federal drilling permits in the Arctic
  •     Shell’s disastrous prior effort at drilling in the Arctic in 2012
  •     Actions planned vs. Shell once the rig arrives in Seattle
  •     The amount of oil that the world can safely burn without disastrous climate impacts
  •     The need to quickly transition to a clean-energy economy
  •     The technical ease with which we could make this transition
  •     The economic benefits to working people of a clean-energy economy
  •     The biggest stumbling block to making this transition:  the influence of money in politics

OCA members will gather signatures on two statewide initiative petitions:

  • WAmend would get big money out of elections through a constitutional amendment
  • CarbonWA would tax carbon pollution and reduce other taxes by an equivalent amount

 

OCA will also conduct a “nickname the rig” contest; the winner will receive a $10 voucher for the Port Angeles Farmers Market.

 

Protesters “un-welcome” Shell’s  Arctic drill rig at Port Angeles Harbor

A drilling rig as high as the Seattle skyline loomed into Port Angeles Harbor for a stay of two weeks before being towed to Seattle and then the Arctic.  A quickly-organized demonstration was led by a coalition of groups from the Olympic Peninsula and the region.

RainDagger Productions of Port Townsend, video documentary

KING 5 TVsHellNo

KIRO 7 TV

Seattle Times

Peninsula Daily News main story and protester interviews

The StrangersHellNo.org_-e1428776506461

NYT story about the fiasco that occurred the last time Shell went drilling in the Arctic

If you would like to be involved in further protests, contact us.
shell-rig-arrivesThe monolith arrives at dawn.

Kayaktivists sign
OCA protesters

 

Kayaktivists on the water

 

 

 

OCA members stand in protest

Support CarbonWA and WAmend initiatives for a healthy future

In spite of Governor Inslee’s attempt to pass a carbon cap-and-trade bill to limit carbon pollution and help fund our underfunded education system, it has become clear that no significant carbon-reduction legislation will be passed in this session of the Legislature, where even the Democratic-controlled State House will not put cap-and-trade on the floor.

Once again, then, the people must speak from the grassroots and take the reigns of leadership when the legislature won’t.  We are lucky to have an enlightened and energetic group of activists at the state level who have filed the CarbonWA initiative for a state carbon tax, similar to the highly-successful carbon tax in British Columbia.  (See below, and also our Links page for more details.)

Olympic Climate Action has endorsed the CarbonWA campaign, and the signature drive has begun.  We will have petitions available at our next meeting, April 12 from 3-5 pm at the Elwha Heritage Center.

OCA has also endorsed the WAmend initiative campaign for a constitutional amendment stating that corporations aren’t people and money isn’t speech, to limit the power of wealthy individuals and corporations to buy elections.  We are hoping you will go out collecting signatures on both petitions.

How lucky we are to live in a democracy where the people can take the Initiative–literally–into our own hands.

A Revenue-Neutral Carbon Tax Ballot Measure Campaign for Washington State

After many days of labor by our legal team and others, we are delighted to announce the birth of Initiative to the Legislature #732!

Ballot language

Our official ballot title (the 30-word summary that will appear on the ballot) is: Initiative Measure No. 732 concerns taxes. This measure would impose a carbon emission tax on certain fossil fuels and fossil-fuel-generated electricity, reduce the sales tax by one percentage point and increase a low-income exemption, and reduce certain manufacturing taxes. Should this measure be enacted into law? Yes [ ] No [ ].

For more details see the plain language and annotated legal language on our website, or read the whole measure yourself.

Petitions-by-mail

If you want some petitions so that you can begin collecting signatures, please email duncan@carbonwa.org with your address and phone number and he’ll work on getting you some.

  • Other upcoming events here.

CarbonWA
3656 Francis Ave N #B
Seattle WA 98103 United States

OCA COMMENTS TWICE ON CLALLAM COUNTY’S SHORELINE PLAN

OCA’s comments to the Planning Commission on the draft SMP – Part One

OCA’s comments to the Planning Commission on the draft SMP – Part Two

Clallam County is replete with coastal and inland waters, both marine and fresh.  These waters, the stuff of life, are at the heart of our unique character and natural systems.  Orcas, fish, wildlife, plant communities, and clean water depend upon well-functioning shorelines.

The County Planning Commission has taken public comments on a revised draft of Clallam County’s Shoreline Master Program (SMP).  Public support is needed to adopt a locally-based SMP that embraces environmental safeguards for Clallam County’s hundreds of miles of shoreline.  These shorelines are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, including sea-level rise, more severe storms and storm surges, erosion, and ocean acidification.

Comments were due Feb. 27.   To see comments that have been submitted (with a few days’ lag time) and for more information on the Draft SMP:   http://www.clallam.net/LandUse/SMP.html.

OCA’s main talking points (for full comments, see links above):

  • The SMP should adopt a protective setback, given the increased potential for erosion due to climate change. Other counties in the Puget Sound region have adopted 125’, 150’ and even 250’ vegetative buffers. Clallam County should set buffers based on best available science, including projected impacts of climate change.
  • A major study of the projected local impacts of climate change is being conducted right now, with a draft report due by the end of June.  Sections of the SMP that could be impacted by climate change should await the publication of this study, or at least be written in such a way that emerging scientific findings will trigger necessary revisions to the SMP.
  • Clallam County and Planning Commission should give preference to protecting and restoring the ecological functions of the shorelines – for water quality, habitat, refuge for salmon, etc.  Intact ecological function will be key to resilience to the impacts of a changing climate.
  • The SMP should limit the erection or expansion of hard structures such as jetties, sea-walls, bulkheads, and riprap on shorelines. These artificial structures alter water movement in ways that increase erosive energy elsewhere, accelerating the breakdown of the system as a whole. Alternatives such as “soft armoring” should be promoted and incentivized.

Protect our communities from exploding oil trains

Three oil train disasters in 72 hours.  Forest Ethics of Bellingham asks us to sign 3 petitions:

All three petitions at http://www.forestethics.org (see “3 Things You Can Do”).

Comment on Clallam County’s Shorelines Plan by Feb. 27

OCA’s comments to the Planning Commission on the draft SMP – Part One

OCA’s comments to the Planning Commission on the draft SMP – Part Two

Clallam County is replete with coastal and inland waters, both marine and fresh.  These waters, the stuff of life, are at the heart of our unique character and natural systems.  Orcas, fish, wildlife, plant communities, and clean water depend upon well-functioning shorelines.

The County Planning Commission is accepting your comments on a revised draft of Clallam County’s Shoreline Master Program (SMP).  Public support is needed to adopt a locally-based SMP that embraces environmental safeguards for Clallam County’s hundreds of miles of shoreline.  These shorelines are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, including sea-level rise, more severe storms and storm surges, erosion, and ocean acidification.

Please attend the public hearing at the Clallam County Courthouse at 6:30 PM on February 18 and provide testimony, or submit comments electronically by COB on Feb. 27 to SMP@co.clallam.wa.us.   For more information on the Draft SMP http://www.clallam.net/LandUse/SMP.html.  Here are some talking points:

  • Personalize your comments to reflect your interest in shorelines. Are you a shoreline property owner? A beach walker? A clam digger? An angler? A bird watcher?
  • The SMP should adopt a protective setback, given the increased potential for erosion due to climate change. Other counties in the Puget Sound region have adopted 125’, 150’ and even 250’ vegetative buffers. Clallam County should set buffers based on best available science, including projected impacts of climate change.
  • A major study of the projected local impacts of climate change is being conducted right now, with a draft report due by the end of June.  Sections of the SMP that could be impacted by climate change should await the publication of this study, or at least be written in such a way that emerging scientific findings will trigger necessary revisions to the SMP.
  • Clallam County and Planning Commission should give preference to protecting and restoring the ecological functions of the shorelines – for water quality, habitat, refuge for salmon, etc.  Intact ecological function will be key to resilience to the impacts of a changing climate.
  • The SMP should limit the erection or expansion of hard structures such as jetties, sea-walls, bulkheads, and riprap on shorelines. These artificial structures alter water movement in ways that increase erosive energy elsewhere, accelerating the breakdown of the system as a whole. Alternatives such as “soft armoring” should be promoted and incentivized.
  • For more detail, see the comments sent by OCA on the draft SMP (links above).

Join the CarbonWA initiative signature drive

The goal is 300,000 signatures by December–can you help?

Our friends at CarbonWA have eloquently made the case for a revenue-neutral carbon tax that would be offset by reductions in the Sales Tax and Business & Occupations Tax, along with a tax credit for the working poor.  Led by Ph.D. economist Yoram Bauman and advised by a host of heavy hitters in the political, legal, and energy worlds, this carefully-crafted initiative could help Washington State join similar market-mechanism efforts in California, Oregon and British Columbia to make the West Coast a regional leader in climate action.

OCA has endorsed CarbonWA and joined as a local chapter.  Please help by making a signature gathering pledge for yourself or your group.

OCA joins letter to Congress opposing Fast-Track and TPP

OCA has joined 45 other organizations in a letter to Congress opposing Fast Track authority on the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement.

“Under negotiation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), for example, are rules that would grant foreign corporations the right to sue governments, in private tribunals, over environmental, public health, and other laws and policies that corporations allege reduce the value of their investment; rules that would require the United States Department of Energy to automatically approve exports of liquefied natural gas to countries in the pacts with no analysis to determine whether exporting natural gas is in the public interest; and a system for “harmonizing” regulations that could significantly weaken public health and environmental protections by offering new opportunities for foreign governments and corporations to intervene early on in our rule-making process.”

OCA notes gap in draft County shoreline plan

Last month, OCA sent a letter to the Clallam County Department of Community Development noting a gap in the Department’s analysis of threats in its proposed update to its Shoreline Master Program (SMP), required under the state Shoreline Management Act – namely, the lack of any reference to the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s study of probable climate impacts in the eastern part of Clallam County–arguably the most recent scientific study of climate impacts relative to shorelines in Clallam County.  We plan to submit more extensive and detailed comments about the draft SMP during public hearings in February.

OCA ACTION ALERT:  SUPPORT INSLEE CLIMATE PROPOSAL

Governor Inslee proposes plan to limit carbon emissions

Declaring it “time for polluters to pay their fair share,” Gov. Jay Inslee just proposed a sweeping new cap-and-trade system that would cut carbon emissions while generating $1 billion a year for schools, transportation projects and low-income tax rebates. Our state is already feeling the impacts of global warming pollution including record-breaking forest fires, the acidification of our waters, and the loss of critical snow pack needed to ensure adequate water supplies to Olympic Peninsula communities.

Olympic Climate Action supports a carbon tax people’s initiative scheduled to begin gathering signatures early next year. But we also support Governor Inslee’s efforts to get us on the path towards meeting our legislative goals, while helping to support our schools, assist low income families, and update our infrastructure.

The Governor’s proposal requires action by our legislature, and we are asking you to take a minute and let them know that you support his proposal. The Washington Environmental Council has a convenient website for doing this quickly:

Contact your legislators and tell them to act on climate!

OCA sends letter to State re: oil transport

The true costs of fossil fuels must be recognized

The Governor’s 2014 budget provided one-time funding for Ecology to conduct a Marine and Rail Oil Transportation Study. The objective of the study is to analyze the risks to public health and safety, and the environmental impacts associated with the transport of oil in Washington state.

The study will inform the Spills Program, Governor and Legislature by focusing on the movement of oil in marine and inland areas, by vessel, and rail. The study will compile existing information and determine if there are information gaps in the existing oil transportation system. If gaps exist, the study will identify ways to address the risk and make public health/safety and environmental protection recommendations for appropriate federal, state, local agencies, or the private sector/industry to take appropriate remedial action.

In our letter to Ecology, OCA states our belief that expansion of the fossil-fuel industry only delays the necessary rapid  transition to a clean-energy economy, and that at the very least, the true costs of fossil fuels must be reflected in their markets.  One such cost is the risk associated with their transport, and the State should take every measure to protect our citizens and ecosystems and see to it that the industry pays for all such measures.

2014 Marine and Rail Oil Transportation Study Preliminary Findings and Recommendations Report

Summary version.

Timeline

  • A completed interim report is due to the Governor and Legislature by December 1, 2014.
  • A final report is due by March 1, 2015.

OCA signs group letter opposing Keystone XL pipeline

Measure fails by bare filibuster-proof margin

In the last hours of the debate over the Keystone XL pipeline bill in the U.S. Senate, a group of climate-activist organizations, including OCA, sent a letter urging opposition to KXL bill S2280.  It’s time to get over the paradigms, technologies, and excesses of the past, and to build the framework for a clean-energy future.  The Canadian Tar Sands simply aren’t worth it from any rational accounting.

In spite of election setbacks for climate action, leaders who want to be able to look their children and grandchildren straight in the eye have been stepping up to the plate, first with an historic climate-mitigation agreement between the U.S. and China, and now with the rejection of Keystone XL.  What happens in the next few years will be critical to our civilization’s future, so it is no time to crawl into a corner.  It’s time for action, not for whimpering in the face of Big Oil and Coal.

OCA endorses CarbonWA’s revenue-neutral carbon tax proposal

The recent election did not prove favorable to climate action in the Washington State Legislature.  It is time for the people to bring the issue forward and do what our gridlocked legislative bodies won’t do on their own.  It is time for our state (and governments around the world) to turn the engines of capitalism in the direction of saving the planet rather than destroying it.  Therefore, OCA has endorsed CarbonWA’s effort to bring forward carbon-tax legislation, if necessary by means of an initiative.  Here’s how they describe it:

Why Washington State Needs Environmental Tax Reform

Environmental tax reform will improve Washington’s economy and reduce Washington’s carbon pollution.  It is a win/win for those of us who want to help spur economic growth and improve air quality by reducing pollution.

Environmental tax reform would:

  • Improve air quality and reduce airborne toxins
  • Help slow ocean acidity and sea level rise
  • Reduce the state sales tax by a full percentage point
  • Fund the Working Families Sales Tax Rebate to help working families
  • Eliminate the Business and Occupation (B&O) tax for manufacturers
  • Pay for these tax reductions with a carbon tax of $25 per ton of CO2

Our goal is to bring environmental tax reform to Washington State, but we can’t do it without your help. Please join us!

To find out more about our draft proposal, please go to our Policy page.

Tuesday’s election will help determine our climate future

Below are two action requests related to Tuesday’s election, which will influence the course for climate action (or inaction) at the federal level.

From Environment America:

If we don’t do more in the next few days, politicians who deny the science behind climate change and want to dismantle EPA programs will win control of the U.S. Congress.[1][2]

That’s why we decided to get involved in this election. And with only a few days to go, we’re pulling out all the stops. Can you chip in today?

Yes, I’ll chip in to keep anti-science, anti-environmental politicians from taking control of Congress.

Imagine Mitch McConnell as Senate Majority Leader. He’s the coal industry’s best friend in Washington — and McConnell already has said he’ll risk shutting down the government to force President Obama to back off on clean water and global warming.[3]

Whether Sen. McConnell gains this power depends on what happens in a few key states, where environmental champions are in danger of losing to candidates who pooh-pooh climate science, demonize the EPA, and pledge allegiance to the oil industry.[4][5]

We’re putting more organizers on the ground to educate and turn out voters on these issues in the last crucial days. But honestly, we need all the help we can get and we need it now.

Yes, I’ll make a donation. On November 5, we’ll focus 100% on the advocacy and grassroots action we’re known best for. Until then, we’re doing all we can to keep those who want to take our environment in the wrong direction from taking more power in Washington.

I hope you join us.

Margie Alt
Environment America and Environment America Voter Action

[1]”First On 2014 Congressional Agenda: Dismantle EPA Protections That Save Lives”, DeSmog Blog, Jan. 14, 2014.
[2] “Midterm elections’ impact on U.S. energy, environment agenda,” Bakken.com, October 30, 2014.
[3]“McConnell’s plan to shut down Obama,” Politico, August 20, 2014.
[4]“GOP candidates straddle the climate change issue,” Sacramento Bee, October 25, 2014.
[5]“GOP Congress would likely push back on EPA rules,” Real Clear Politics, October 16, 2014.

And this from 350.org:

For the first time in a long time, climate change is a key issue in many of the races that will be decided on Tuesday. Your voice really matters.

Here are two things you can do:

1) Pledge to vote for climate action, and tell your friends to do the same. The climate movement can make a difference in this election — if we turn out in force.

The impacts of climate change get more dramatic by the day, and the influence of the fossil fuel industry continues to warp our ability to see real solutions. But the climate movement is starting to be a force to be reckoned with. Usually we send you emails asking you to join marches, sit ins, trainings, or rallies. We believe those are vital ways of demonstrating and growing power — and we believe that voting is another crucial tool.

2) Help South Dakota’s No KXL coalition swing the Senate.

That’s right: there’s one local race that could have a huge impact nationally — and you have an opportunity to be part of it now, no matter where you live. In the last couple of weeks, we got word from our allies in South Dakota that the race for Senate there is way closer than people think. Rick Weiland has come out strong against the Keystone XL pipeline and in favor of climate action. It turns out his progressive, anti-Keystone message is resonating with voters across the state, and especially with tribal leaders who have played a crucial role in the resistance against KXL.

Right now, there’s a Native-led grassroots coalition called “Lakota Vote” working to turn out record numbers of people through an eleventh-hour grassroots campaign in Lakota Sioux communities. Native American votes could decide the race in South Dakota this year, and a win in South Dakota could swing the Senate against Keystone.

This year’s election will determine the political playing field during a period when our democracy must grapple with one of the most dangerous and complex threats we’ve ever faced. We don’t have much time to act on climate, and these next few years are a precious window. November 4th could determine whether that window opens or closes.

And for a bit of analysis:

Could a Republican Senate derail Obama’s climate agenda?

ClimateWire | Nathanael Massey

With only a week to go before the 2014 midterm elections, polling from key battleground states indicates a small but widening advantage for Republicans. A six-seat net gain in the Senate would put both chambers of Congress under GOP control, uniting the two houses in opposition to many of the hallmark policies of the Obama presidency, including rules to curb carbon emissions from the nation’s power sector.

Whether a Republican Senate could seriously imperil the president’s Climate Action Plan, as the party’s leadership has promised to do, is another matter. Both House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) have indicated in the past several months that climate regulation proposed by U.S. EPA, and specifically the Clean Power Plan (CPP), would be a prime target if Republicans gain control of the Senate. Both responded to the CPP’s proposal in early June by proposing legislation to curb or weaken the rule, although those proposals died in the Senate.

But even if Republicans take the Senate next week, the leadership’s ambitions will likely run up against the basic math of the legislative process. If Republicans pick up the six seats they need to gain control of the Senate, they’ll still be shy of the three-fifths majority needed to override filibusters by Democrats.

And while enough coal-state Democrats might conceivably be swayed across the aisle to beat a filibuster on climate regulation, “it’s hard to think of a plausible scenario where you end up with a [two-thirds] supermajority” needed to override a presidential veto, said Nathan Richardson, an assistant professor at the South Carolina School of Law.

State Legislators: dis-affiliate from ALEC

OCA has signed on to a nationwide letter to state legislators initiated by the Natural Resources Defense Council, asking them to dis-affliate from any connections with the climate-change-denying American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), in spite of ALEC’s feeble attempts to deny their denial.

Election 2014:  Forward or backward on climate?

Probably the most important thing you can do right now to protect us from climate chaos is to get involved in this year’s elections; OCA does not have an endorsement policy, but here are some ideas for your consideration:

OCA writes Clallam PUD objecting to their opposition to a carbon tax

Here is the letter that OCA wrote to the Clallam County Public Utility District (PUD) objecting to their letter to the Energy Northwest power suppliers’ consortium opposing the idea of a carbon tax.  This PUD position was taken without public input, and the letter was sent without public notice.  It is a great disservice to the power users and voters who elected this board, and it represents neither the truth nor the input of the PUD’s constituency.  We expect better of our elected officials.

To PUD Board re opposition to carbon tax legislation

People’s Climate March–solidarity actions across the Peninsula

People’s Climate March:  solidarity actions across the Peninsula on Sept. 20-21

On the weekend of Sept. 20-21, people around the world will gather for what promises to be the biggest climate demonstration in history, centered upon the People’s Climate March in New York City on Sept. 21, two days prior to a special climate summit being called by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, where world leaders (not just their climate negotiators) will be called upon to get serious about a world climate action plan.

The message:  it’s time to act.  And here on the Olympic Peninsula, we will march in solidarity in three places:

Port Angeles:  “People’s Climate March:  Connecting the Dots”

On Saturday, September 20, 2014, from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m., beginning and ending at the Port Angeles City Pier, OCA, along with other community groups, will lead a vigil, rally, and march.

10-10:30:  Semi-silent vigil led by faith communities (or family time at the beach)

10:30-11:30:  Rally with speakers from a variety of organizations speaking about how climate change impacts them in their lives and work

11:30-12:30:  March around downtown Port Angeles, ending at the observation deck at the end of City Pier for photographs

12:30-1:  Semi-silent vigil to close the activity (or more family time at the beach)

The “dots” are the various issues that impact and are impacted by climate change.  We are seeking broad involvement by people involved in a myriad of social issues, because climate change will affect us all.  Here is a partial list of participating organizations, along with OCA:

  • Stop the Checkpoints
  • MoveOn
  • Green Party
  • Veterans for Peace
  • St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church
  • Port Angeles Dzogchen Sangha
  • Sierra Club North Olympic Group

The visuals will center around a large painting of Earth which will be visually connected by ribbons to smaller “dots” with phrases suggesting the surrounding issues.  These images will be carried in a long line during the march and then displayed in sunburst fashion, with Earth at the center, for a photograph with marchers at the City Pier observation deck.

People’s Climate March PA Poster

Photos from that day:

Kia ArmstrongThe DotsGroup shot

Sequim:  Climate talk and march at Railroad Bridge Park

On Saturday, Sept. 20, OCA member Bob Lynette will give a talk on climate change and its local impacts at the Dungeness River Audubon Center from 10-1.  Following his talk, OCA members will lead a brief march and photo shoot in support of the worldwide mobilization.

Railroad Bridge

Port Townsend:  Rally, song, and march at Pope Marine Park

Our colleagues at the Fossil Fuel NW Action group will hold a rally and march on Sunday, Sept. 21, beginning at 3 PM at the Pope Marine Park waterfront.  PT Peoples Climate Action poster

Two numbers of import:

401: The peak concentration of carbon in the atmosphere (in parts per million) measured by the world’s leading scientists this spring — higher than any time in human history.

Zero: The amount of progress we’ll make if we stay home. There’s no guarantee this will work. The only thing that’s for sure is if we stay home, nothing will change — except the climate.  More than 2000 events are being planned around the world, in 130 countries…let’s do our part on this beautiful corner of the planet!

Disruption chronicles the making of the People’s Climate March

Disruption logo

As a lead-up to these solidarity actions, Disruption weaves together political intrigue, mind-blowing science, and an insider’s view of the largest climate mobilization in history.  It features Bill McKibben, Naomi Klein, Van Jones, and some fresh faces with powerful new stories.  Watch it here.

Why we need a carbon tax now

OCA is affiliated with the Citizens’ Climate Lobby, a national organization lobbying for national carbon fee-and-dividend legislation.  Here is an editorial from the Wenatchee World written by two fellow CCL members:  Carbon tax commentary.

OCA is communicating with U.S. Representative Derek Kilmer to urge him to co-sponsor carbon-tax legislation.  We urge letters to Rep. Kilmer on this subject:  Representative Derek Kilmer, Kilmer District Office, 345 6th Street, Suite 500, Bremerton, WA  98337.  Or submit your comments at his website:  https://kilmer.house.gov/contact/email-me.

Say no to more crude at Cherry Point

OCA hosted an event centered around the risks of oil transport in our local marine waters on July 11, 2014, featuring Clallam County Commissioner Mike Doherty and the film The Big Fix.  Here is a slideshow  from that program detailing the risks to our local marine waters and economy from proposals to expand oil export facilities in the Salish Sea.

These facilities cannot be built without passing public scrutiny, and it is important to make your voice heard.  Here is a message from Laura Ackerman, Clean Air Healthy Communities Committee Chair, Sierra Club Washington State Chapter:

Big Oil sees Washington State as nothing more than a loading dock for shipping their dangerous, climate-killing products — and each new proposal puts our communities, rivers and coastline at risk.  Right now, BP is fighting to increase the amount of crude oil coming in and out of the Cherry Point Refinery through the Salish Sea and on dangerous trains running through Washington communities.  Luckily, a court-mandated environmental impact assessment may protect Washington from this expansion of oil traffic. Take action now to support environmental protection!

This all started in 2001, when BP built a second pier at their refinery just north of Bellingham at Cherry Point without a thorough environmental review to assess the pier’s impact and the risks to our communities and waterways.  But thanks to the efforts of several environmental groups, the courts directed the Army Corps of Engineers to do the environmental assessment that should have happened over a decade ago. The draft version of this report was released in May, and now they want the public to weigh in.

Whether it’s expanding the Cherry Point Refinery or building oil export terminals at Grays Harbor or the Port of Vancouver, Big Oil’s plans for Washington mean increased danger of disastrous oil spills and even more explosive oil trains traveling through our communities. These plans are all risk and no reward for Washingtonians.

Climate adaptation grant for North Olympic Peninsula

Olympic Climate Action helped develop this grant , “Planning for Climate Change on the North Olympic Peninsula Summary” and serves as a partner on it.  We will encourage local elected bodies to implement the changes recommended in the report, which will be developed with reference to the best available science and in discussion with the community at large.  Part of the responsibility of government is to look at emerging trends and plan for them, and no trend will be as important in this century as climate change.

OCA helps land climate-impacts grant

A consortium led by the North Olympic Peninsula Resource Conservation and Development Council, including Olympic Climate Action in Clallam County and the Local 2020 Climate Action Group in east Jefferson County, has been awarded a $152,000 grant from the National Estuary Program’s Watershed Protection & Restoration Fund, administered by the the WA State Dept. of Ecology.  The project, pending finalization of a contract, will consult extensively with local stakeholders and scientific experts to produce a study summarizing expected climate impacts and adaptation needs for the North Olympic Peninsula, and then reach out to the public and local governments about changes to land use plans that would help to protect people and resources.

Comment to feds on Keystone XL

It’s time for Secretary of State Kerry and President Obama to stand up to oil companies and just say no.  Submit your official public comments on the Keystone XL pipeline  by March 7.

Divest from fossil-fuel companies

Take a stand against an industry whose cynicism and misinformation are wreaking havoc on the planet:  move your investments out of fossil fuels.  Join the pledge drive to make no new investments in the largest 200 fossil fuel companies, divest existing investments over the next 5 years, and reinvest in a healthy new economy.  Or start a fossil fuel divestment campaign in your town, religious organization, or other community group.

Comments to State Leg on proposed spill bills

OCA comments on proposed oil-spill bills to WA State Legislature

Here are the letters we sent; we urge you to write as well.  Both legislators responded positively to our letters, so we’re encouraged.

2014-02-03 Hargrove

2014-02-03 Tharinger

4-H environment club forming

4-H-environment club flyer

Feeling overwhelmed?

Here are some things you can do in the community and as an individual.

 

100 Demonstrate vs Keystone in Port Angeles & Port Townsend

Calling on President Obama to Reject Keystone XL; State Department Study Is Flawed35 demonstrators at First and Valley Streets in PA

As part of a national day of protests, Olympic Climate Action in Port Angeles and Fossil Fuel Action in Port Townsend conducted rallies on February 3, calling on President Obama to reject the controversial Keystone XL pipeline following the release of the State Department’s flawed Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement.  Thanks to all who braved the chill night air!  We were even featured in The Nation magazine’s online article about the nationwide rally. Continue reading

EPA wants feedback on power plant standards

The EPA is asking for the public’s input on new limits on carbon emissions — add your name to show your support. Continue reading

Comment on Longview coal export terminal

The biggest potential impact of our state on climate change is not from our own emissions but from the emissions we may facilitate elsewhere, for instance through proposed new coal-export terminals at Cherry Point and Longview.  The Washington Department of Ecology has announced the dates of scoping for the Longview proposal, during which time it will seek comments on what subjects will have to be analyzed in the proposal’s Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).  It is critically important that public comments call for consideration of climate-change impacts.

Send comments to State Climate Workgroup

Washington State is working on a strategy to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions statewide, and your testimony is needed by Oct. 30:

Clallam County to discuss Climate Plan

ClallamCounty has a Climate Action Plan for its own governmental operations which sets the following carbon-emissions reduction targets: Continue reading